An Interview with Digital Artist Deborah Boyd

Snowfall in Central Park
First Place and Best in Show Awards


Jean Moore
I was delighted to hear of Deborah Boyd’s recent first place and best of show awards for “Snowfall in Central Park” because this is a digital painting that was entered into Deborah’s local Art Guild show. While painting digitally has been accepted for over 20 years in the commercial art fields, it has not been so in the fine art field. Deborah said of entering this piece:

I joined a local art guild about nine months ago. While I was readily accepted into their group, when the annual Fine Art Show came around, several long time members decided my form of art didn’t fit with the definition of “fine art”. At our last meeting, I brought in one of my paintings and my Wacom tablet and gave a description of how I ‘paint’. I told them that I did not mass produce computerized art. I said that the difference between what I do and what they do is that they paint on paper or canvas; I paint, then put my art on paper or canvas. They reluctantly allowed me to exhibit. 

I was able to catch up with Deborah and ask her a few more questions about herself and artwork.

Jean Moore

How or Why did you get into digital fine art painting?

Deborah Boyd

I was the CEO of a local tourism bureau and due to high costs, I brought our advertising in-house. Photography was always a favorite hobby. I was looking for something to make our advertising pop, when I came across a class for digital painting. The thought intrigued me so I took the class. It was wonderful. It was taught by a woman who was proficient in fine art and was looking to the next big way to create art. When I finished the class, I showed my graphic designer and marketing director and asked that they take a class. Again, we were fortunate in having someone proficient in fine art teach us these skills. We used our newfound knowledge to create a book featuring artwork of the area’s highlights. That book garnered a Gold Addy at the regional Advertising Federation Awards and the rest, as they say, was history. I left my job in July, 2011 to pursue a career as an artist, writer and videographer.  

Jean Moore 
Could you walk us through how you created “Snowfall In Central Park”?

Deborah Boyd

It was truly a labor of love. I was in New York for a conference when more than 15 inches of snow fell. Tree branches were falling killing people and the city recommended everyone stay away from Central Park So, I headed to Central Park.  I took several photos. When I returned home, I put together a rough photo composite in Photoshop of what I wanted the final project to look like. I moved that composite into Corel Painter and with my Wacom tablet and pen, “painted” using a combination of several brushes and techniques. I returned it to photoshop and did some fine tuning: sizing, and readjusting levels and colors. Then I moved it back to Corel Painter and “painted the entire thing using an oil brush. It took almost a month to complete. 
  
Jean Moore 
What kind of things influence your art?

Deborah Boyd

While you wouldn’t know this from Snowfall in Central Park, I LOVE color! Lots of it! I enjoy re-purposing photos I take and making them the way I think they should be. Digital art affords me the opportunity to experiment with all different types of art and brushes.

Jean Moore 
How has being a part of an Artist Guild helped you as an artist?

Deborah Boyd

I was a photographer first and I was fortunate to be taught these techniques by women who were fine artists. They taught me that there are no boundaries in art and – photographers will get this – that it’s okay to go outside of the lines!  The Art Guild has a group of wonderfully talented women. We also have different artists at our monthly meetings showing us new techniques. Since I embellish my canvases, their input has been invaluable. 


Jean Moore  
Do you sell Limited Editions or open edition prints? 


Deborah Boyd

Both. On my signed works which are always accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. I have a sliding scale on pricing. For example, Snowfall  in Central Park will have 50, 8×10’s, five 16×20’s and  one 16×20 on fine art rag paper. It’s the only one that’s embellished, making it  one of a kind. All those will be signed and have certificate of authenticity. When the edition  runs out, it will be retired. While the print can  be ordered online, these are simply reprints and will never be signed.

Jean Moore 
Where can reader’s go to see more of your work?


Deborah Boyd

I’m crazy about marketing so there are several places. www.OwnADebbie.com ; www.Deborah-Boyd.ArtistWebsites.com or like me on facebook at, www.Facebook.com/OwnADebbie .

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